Regional Guides and Resources

The United States is a very big country with a wide variety of climates and habitats. Every plant species has a unique set of needs, such as minimum and maximum temperature, water, and soil type. Light is a factor as well, of course; areas closer to the tropics have more stable light levels, while northern regions have a lot of light in the summer and not much at all in the winter. Of course, climate is on a gradient, but it is useful to divide the country into several gardening regions based on average high and low temperatures, number of frost-free days, amounts of precipitation, and other factors. It’s tempting to think that the tropics are naturally more suited to growing everything, but this isn’t true; while there are many beautiful tropical flowers, vegetables like peas  and broccoli  prefer cool temperatures, and lilacs  only grow in areas with freezing winters.

To keep your garden or yard looking beautiful, work with what you have. Live in a dry area? Try a cactus  and succulent  garden instead of a lawn. Are your winters cold and snowy? You might enjoy a beautiful display of lilacs when the weather finally warms up. There are plants suited to every region, and of course the boudaries of each region are fuzzy. With a little TLC, you might be able to grow out of your climate zone.

Looking for a way to tie everything together aesthetically in your garden? Not sure where to begin? Some of these theme gardens might inspire you and help you plan your outdoor space.

Interested in making your garden more efficient?  Check out our Guide to Hydroponic Vegetable Gardening for more information.

Just need some general advice? You might find the help you need on our page of gardening tips. If the answer isn’t there, it’s out on the web somewhere and the gardening resources page is a great place to start.

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