India and the Naxalites

I just watched this video and soon as I watched this I was compelled to write about it. Indians are very ignorant, and I am one of them. There is an ongoing battle between Indian Government and Naxalites that will play an important role in India’s future of integrity and development.

What I learnt after watching the video and reading fellow articles is summarized as follows.

There is a tremendous increase in millionaires in India in past decade. Is this because of the growth of Indian Inc? If that would be the case then the Indian middle class and lower class would be in quite better position. Most of these millionaires belong to the field involving natural resources like Real Estate, Minerals, Coal, Silver, Energy and rest are from service sector. How, these industrialists are able to tap such a huge amount of resources, which infact belong to the People of India and turn profit from it. Naxalism is the by -product of such practices only.

Naxalism

Naxalism is a wound in Indian State and will be effecting its integrity if not dealt properly.It is an immediate result of the Corruption and Ignorance of Indian Government , which prioritized profit of Private firms over the land and social respect of the native people. The problem could be resolved with much more mutual respect for each other. There is a foul smell of corruption in the allotment of the mineral-rich lands to the private organisations.

The term ‘Naxal’ derives from the name of the village Naxalbari in the state of West Bengal, India, where the movement had its origin. The Naxals are considered far-left radical communists, supportive of Maoist political sentiment and ideology. Their origin can be traced to the split in 1967 of the Communist Party of India (Marxist), leading to the formation of the Communist Party of India (Marxist–Leninist). Initially the movement had its centre in West Bengal. In later years, it spread into less developed areas of rural central and eastern India, such as Chhattisgarh, Orissa and Andhra Pradesh through the activities of underground groups like the Communist Party of India (Maoist).

For the past 10 years, it has grown mostly from displaced tribals and natives who are fighting against exploitation from major Indian corporations and local officials whom they believe to be corrupt.

Naxalism is an movement for a good cause, done wrong. It a lost cause now where the way of achieving thing has become much more important than the cause itself.

The Maoists’ fight with the Indian government began 50 years ago, just after India became independent. A loose collection of anti-government communist groups – that initially fought for land reform – they are said to be India’s biggest internal security threat. Over time, their focus has expanded to include more fundamental questions about how India is actually governed.

The uprising by Maoist fighters and its suppression by the Indian government, has claimed more than 10,000 lives since 1980, and displaced 12 million people. Many of the victims are not even associated with either side. They are simply caught in the crossfire. And the violence is escalating as both sides mount offensive after counter-offensive.
In this battle the looser are the people residing in that area who become the target of both the Indian Government and the Naxalites.

I am sharing this video, so that you can watch this as well.

Why Rajiv Chowk is so called?

Most of us know about the famous Rajiv Chowk intersection at delhi that has become one of the most busy metro station. With the two most busy lines interesecting at the same station, it is one of the busiest station of the Delhi Metro.

The name of the chowk , “Rajiv Chowk” is after a student named Rajiv Goswami. Rajiv was a commerce student at the Deshbandhu College, Delhi University who came into prominence when he attempted self-immolation to protest against Prime Minister V.P. Singh‘s implementation of the Mandal Commission recommendations for job reservations for backward castes in India. Goswami spearheaded a formidable movement against the Mandal Commission and his act of self-immolation led to larger protests and a series of self-immolations by college students throughout India. During Mandal commission agitation, the AIIMS intersection in Delhi was temporarily renamed by students to Rajiv Chowk in a celebration of his selfless act.

Check out the image – http://www.tribuneindia.com/2000/20000101/windows/pages/30.htm

Gandhi – The person in timeline

Gandhi in his childhood
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhi in his teens
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi in South Africa in 1895
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi as Lawyer
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhi in Videshi outfit at 19 years of age
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Young and handsome Gandhi
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhi with his wife Kasturba after returning from South Africa
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhi with his collegues in South Africa
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Mohandas Gandhi with his friends in South Africa
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhi and his wife Kasturba
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhi preaching a group of people
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhi interacting with his followers sitting in a train
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhi in Downing Street, England
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhi in Downing Street, London, UK
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhi giving speach to his followers
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhi on Salt March
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhi on Dandi March
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhiji lifting the salt
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Mahatma Gandhi with a facial expression of peace
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhi with his supporters in the train
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhiji with two women Manu and Abha
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhiji on a walk with Khan Abdul Ghaffar Khan
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

The two women Manu and Abha as his walking sticks
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhi-Nehru on a happy mood
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhiji and Nehruji on serious discussions for attaining independence to India
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhiji addressing the huge gatherings pertaining to Salt Satyagraha

Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhiji with Jinnah in 1944
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhiji popularly known as Bapu with a sweet smile
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhiji along with his followers for Salt Satyagraha
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

A young boy leads Gandhiji for a walk
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhiji spinning the wheel
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Bapu reading newspaper
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhi and Kasturba in their old age
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhiji on fast
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Bapu’s last walk for his prayer on January 30, 1948
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Mahatma Gandhi – The Father of India (1869-1948)
Young Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi

Mysterious Iron Pillar at Delhi

Standing at the center of the Quwwatul Mosque the Iron Pillar is one of Delhi’s most curious structures. Dating back to 4th century A.D., the pillar bears an inscription which states that it was erected as a flagstaff in honour of the Hindu god, Vishnu, and in the memory of the Gupta King Chandragupta II (375-413). How the pillar moved to its present location remains a mystery. The pillar also highlights ancient India’s achievements in metallurgy. The pillar is made of 98 per cent wrought iron and has stood 1,600 years without rusting or decomposing.

The pillar—over seven metres high and weighing more than six tonnes—was erected by Kumara Gupta of Gupta dynasty that ruled northern India in AD 320-540.

Some physical facts about the pillar are reasonably well-established: it is 7.3 metres tall, with one metre below the ground; the diameter is 48 centimetres at the foot, tapering to 29 cm at the top, just below the base of the wonderfully crafted capital; it weighs approximately 6.5 tonnes, and was manufactured by forged welding. But, this said, nearly everything else about the pillar is surrounded by acute controversy: For whom was it made? Exactly when? Where did it originally stand before it was moved to Delhi? What is the true import of the long inscription in Brahmi characters engraved upon it? Who placed the later inscriptions on it, and when? Who had the pillar moved to its present location, and why? What exact processes were followed in forging it into shape at that early a point of time, the 4th/5th century AD? Above all, from the scientists’ point of view, what is the secret, the great mystery, behind the fact of its being virtually non-rusting? There seems to be no end to the questions.